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BSL: Will Flacco have freedom? Schaub didn't


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#1 BSLMikeRandall

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:39 PM

http://baltimorespor...m-schaub-didnt/

 

Folks in Houston, and Matt Schaub himself now that he's a Raider, feel like their offense was held back by Gary Kubiak's restrictions on deviating from his game plan. Will Flacco be put under the same restrictions?


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#2 Hooded Viper

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 03:13 PM

Good read. 

 

My thoughts are that I can understand why Kubiak wouldn't have enough faith in Schaub to give him the "keys" to the Corvette offense.  Anyone who knows anything about football could tell that Schaub was the weakest link on a team that should have been to the SB.  I am thoroughly convinced if Kubiak had Flacco as his QB that Houston would have been to multiple SB's.  They have all the pieces in place and Schaub was constantly failing to do his part.  You even pointed out in your column that Schaub failed to call a time out when he saw Cameron was going to blitz to his roll out side.  So, even if he wasn't allowed to change the play, any QB worth a damn would call a timeout, go to the sideline and tell them what he saw and that play is going to fail.  He didn't and threw a pick-6, 1 of 4 thrown in consecutive games...epic fail.

 

The other thing I believe is that Kubiak gets a QB that has equity based upon a strong post season track record, despite last year.  He gets a guy who is a stud in the 2 minute offense, has proven he can make the final drive on the biggest stage to tie or win the game.  He gets a former SB MVP who tied a record for post season production with the best QB of all time, Joe Montana.  He also gets a more athletic, stronger, more durable QB that has the best arm in the game today.  I just don't see Joe having the same restrictions on him because I believe there will be more of an imbedded trust.  Kubiak knows he has a guy that has the tools, the talent, and has been-there-done-that.

 

I do feel there will be some restrictions early on until Kubiak feels Joe has a feel for what the offense is doing, but if he is satisfied by the end of training camp then I see no reason Joe wouldn't have much more freedom than Schaub.


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#3 Pedro Cerrano

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 07:35 PM

I think, and this may be oversimplifying, that Kubiak will give Joe a lot more free reign than Schaub due to the difference in overall talent.


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#4 jkough1

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 06:26 AM

I also think this is one play that can't sum up a season for Houston.

 

Schaub specifically says, "once we start the motion, it was game on."  And then he proceeds to throw Kubiak under the bus right there, "so we had a very very poor play like I told you."

 

1.  I think Schaub had the ability to check out of the play before he started the motion.  But no QB ever, if there's a motion play that's timing based would be able to stop that.  Even the great Peyton Manning would be stuck in a play like that.  (other than to call a timeout).  

 

2.  If there is one thing that Joe is infuriatingly good at is calling timeouts when he shouldn't snap the ball.  Granted, sometimes it's the first play of the quarter, or it's coming right out of a TV break when it seems completely inexcusable.  But his game awareness of the clock seem much more aware of what Schaub is indicating it was.

 

3.  I think this argument is an encapsulation of one bad season at the end of Schaub's declining career.  The INTs and Pick 6's went up, there's a bit of cherry picking here.  Go back and look at Houston's success as an offense.  Look at how many years it lasted.  It's like measuring great QBs in their decline years, you'd get a above average QB instead of a great one. The major tenets of the Kubiak offense are installed in several systems and he's had a lot of success.  I'm not ready to say the league has "figured it out" after one bad season where the wheels were falling off.

 

As for the keys to car.  I think the answer is no.  And I think it's Harbaugh that's holding Flacco back.  We've seen it through multiple OC's.  He hates the TO's and isn't willing to give the risk up.  Perhaps as the defense improves that'll change some...but I don't see it happening, but I don't necessarily see that as a bad thing. 


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#5 bnickle

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 06:51 AM

For the most part, Joe should be in a fairly strict, structured offense running the plays the OC calls. He's too inconsistent to have a lot of freedom. Of course, he needs to have the ability to audible. He needs to have  input during the game planning and interactively throughout the game.

 

 

 

However, Im done with the idea of letting Joe call the game. Hes way too inconsistent, and quite frankly, likely  not smart enough to do it succefully over the long term.


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#6 BSLMikeRandall

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 06:57 AM

I also think this is one play that can't sum up a season for Houston.

 

Schaub specifically says, "once we start the motion, it was game on."  And then he proceeds to throw Kubiak under the bus right there, "so we had a very very poor play like I told you."

 

1.  I think Schaub had the ability to check out of the play before he started the motion.  But no QB ever, if there's a motion play that's timing based would be able to stop that.  Even the great Peyton Manning would be stuck in a play like that.  (other than to call a timeout).  

 

2.  If there is one thing that Joe is infuriatingly good at is calling timeouts when he shouldn't snap the ball.  Granted, sometimes it's the first play of the quarter, or it's coming right out of a TV break when it seems completely inexcusable.  But his game awareness of the clock seem much more aware of what Schaub is indicating it was.

 

3.  I think this argument is an encapsulation of one bad season at the end of Schaub's declining career.  The INTs and Pick 6's went up, there's a bit of cherry picking here.  Go back and look at Houston's success as an offense.  Look at how many years it lasted.  It's like measuring great QBs in their decline years, you'd get a above average QB instead of a great one. The major tenets of the Kubiak offense are installed in several systems and he's had a lot of success.  I'm not ready to say the league has "figured it out" after one bad season where the wheels were falling off.

 

As for the keys to car.  I think the answer is no.  And I think it's Harbaugh that's holding Flacco back.  We've seen it through multiple OC's.  He hates the TO's and isn't willing to give the risk up.  Perhaps as the defense improves that'll change some...but I don't see it happening, but I don't necessarily see that as a bad thing. 

The quote the was from Kubiak, not Schaub. So in a way he took responsibility instead of throwing the player under the bus. 

 

I know it's just one play, but as I pointed out Schaub mentioned being able to have freedoms in Oakland that he didn't have in Houston, so it clearly was going on for a while. And I don't think Schaub is an awful QB, he's just meh. I wouldn't want him in a big game, but I'd take him to get me though a regular season. Like a Jay Cutler probably, or Chad Pennington in his days. Thats the first goal for Oakland. Schaub can get them to .500 maybe 9-7 probably. 

 

I still think Kubiak is one of the best at his position. But OCs can't just assume whatever play they call will work when the defense who has also been studying you all week knows which tendencies and formations to look out for. Chancellor probably knew exactly where that bootleg was going once the receiver went in motion because that;s when he moved up to the line.

 

I'm not a coach, but I find it hard to believe that even after the motion, if the QB doesn't like what he sees that he can't kill it, or that a team doesn't have a simple default fast audible like everyone runs a five yard slant. I do see how it is used for timing sometimes, but they also use motion to figure out if they are facing man or zone coverage. I would think that if it doesn't come up the coverage they want for the play that's called the QB should be at liberty to adjust it.

 

I just don't want to hear Flacco ever say again, "I just run the plays that they tell me" like last year. Or Torrey saying in week 15, "we're not on the same page yet." 


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#7 jkough1

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 07:09 AM

Ha...I thought that quote was from Schaub.  My bad.

 

I mean there area  lot of reasons in Kubiak's system once the motion starts you can't stop the play.  They run plays from a base set of motion and I'd imagine interior line assignments play a big part in this.  While you make the pre-snap read/call there, you just can't audible once the guys are in motion because if anyone else moves it's a false start.  

 

My biggest issue with the quote and play we've picked is that you can't pick and choose a play.  How many times in this game did Houston put a guy in motion.  What were their patterns from that?  Did they burn Chancellor on a similar move later in the game? 

 

You're going to win some plays, but when you play against Seattle you're going to lose some too.  Just ask Peyton Manning.  Sometimes the defense is just better than you.

 

But I agree, Flacco/Smith/et al need to be on the same page and this thing needs to get going.  Let's not undersell the improvement to the running game that comes with Kubiak and the ways that improves Flacco's play.  The return of the play action is going to open up a lot of stuff and I think Joe is a really good fit for the bootleg stuff because the depth of his throws will keep teams more honest than Schaub.  The running game was awful last year and if it gets as good as it has been with Houston and Rice returns to form, Flacco could have a really big year.


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