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#1 Oriole85

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 09:09 AM

http://sports.yahoo....-224316516.html

 

Like you'd expect, pretty sweet!


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#2 BSLMikeLowe

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 01:57 PM

Pretty soon, players aren't going to want to go to the NFL. It will be too big a step down.

 

One thing that made me think though was something Saban said, about how the players will never need to leave the new building. While I'm sure that the convenience is attractive, facilities this take the reality that football players aren't part of the campus community to a whole new level. I'm sure many of the coaches prefer to keep their players isolated from the rest of the student-body for obvious reasons. But it sure seems like we are getting even further away from college football players actually getting a "college experience."



#3 Oriole85

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 02:06 PM

Pretty soon, players aren't going to want to go to the NFL. It will be too big a step down.

 

One thing that made me think though was something Saban said, about how the players will never need to leave the new building. While I'm sure that the convenience is attractive, facilities this take the reality that football players aren't part of the campus community to a whole new level. I'm sure many of the coaches prefer to keep their players isolated from the rest of the student-body for obvious reasons. But it sure seems like we are getting even further away from college football players actually getting a "college experience."

With the athlete specific dorms, that's pretty much what is at these universities to begin with. The Kentucky basketball experience is similar. When you have Johnny Manziel only classes online, he's not exactly interacting with the regular students. Not exactly, the typical "student-athlete" experience. I'm sure these athletes like the fact they are in their own world, lessens distractions. It's probably a drawing point to go to these elite athletic factories (I'm using that term loosely). At the same time, I'm sure many of the athletes who go to place like Notre Dame want to go there, so they can get the whole college experience.


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#4 Russ

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 02:11 PM

Practically speaking, any scholarship athlete at a D1 school is an athlete first and a student second. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2

#5 BSLMikeLowe

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 02:15 PM

With the athlete specific dorms, that's pretty much what is at these universities to begin with. The Kentucky basketball experience is similar. When you have Johnny Manziel only classes online, he's not exactly interacting with the regular students. Not exactly, the typical "student-athlete" experience. I'm sure these athletes like the fact they are in their own world, lessens distractions. It's probably a drawing point to go to these elite athletic factories (I'm using that term loosely). At the same time, I'm sure many of the athletes who go to place like Notre Dame want to go there, so they can get the whole college experience.

 

Didn't realize Manziel only takes classes online, but I was actually going to say that is the next step....players won't ever have to go into a classroom.

 

While there are advantages to being isolated like that (fewer distractions) I have to think there are some drawbacks too. Learning to overcome distractions and focus on goals is one of the things you learn in college, or simply at that age in general.



#6 Oriole85

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 02:37 PM

Practically speaking, any scholarship athlete at a D1 school is an athlete first and a student second. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2

It's a bit of an oxymoron in the order of it especially when it comes to football and basketball and the expectations for them from the school. I had a writing class with the punter of Colorado when I was there and I actually ended up getting paired with him for some writing reviews, a bunch of us were doing the whole pay-for-play issue. I just remember when I worded it student-athlete, his feedback was all the coaches will tell you that football comes first.


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#7 Oriole85

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 03:08 PM

Didn't realize Manziel only takes classes online, but I was actually going to say that is the next step....players won't ever have to go into a classroom.

 

While there are advantages to being isolated like that (fewer distractions) I have to think there are some drawbacks too. Learning to overcome distractions and focus on goals is one of the things you learn in college, or simply at that age in general.

I put up an article a while back, night be in the Manziel section? I'm sure other players do it as well, but they don't receive the attention for this that JM does. What Manziel said was he went to classes for the first few weeks or so in the 2nd semester and other students were asking for him for his autograph, taking picture, etc and it got to be too much for him. But partying on Bourbon Street among his other social activities wasn't.

 

I agree with a lot of what you have to say. There are definitely advantages but you can't live your whole life in a bubble. And for those who actually do become pros, they'll be worse off for it in the long-run if they self-isolate themselves. And yes, it's counterintutive to the mission of college, which is adapting academically as well as socially. The whole "learning doesn't stop in the classrom." In essence, I wish they would get away from this, but realistically it's only going to become more like this.


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#8 BSLMikeLowe

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 03:29 PM

I put up an article a while back, night be in the Manziel section? I'm sure other players do it as well, but they don't receive the attention for this that JM does. What Manziel said was he went to classes for the first few weeks or so in the 2nd semester and other students were asking for him for his autograph, taking picture, etc and it got to be too much for him. But partying on Bourbon Street among his other social activities wasn't.

 

I agree with a lot of what you have to say. There are definitely advantages but you can't live your whole life in a bubble. And for those who actually do become pros, they'll be worse off for it in the long-run if they self-isolate themselves. And yes, it's counterintutive to the mission of college, which is adapting academically as well as socially. The whole "learning doesn't stop in the classrom." In essence, I wish they would get away from this, but realistically it's only going to become more like this.

 

Even for players who don't go on to the NFL, I think they and the programs end up doing a disservice by not giving themselves the opportunity to acquire the social/life skills other students do. But it's more about what will win games than preparing them for life. And like I said, the coaches I'm sure overwhelmingly encourage it. And that's understandable, since in addition to winning football coaches are also held responsible for the actions of 100 young men, regardless of time or location. Being able to keep them all under one roof makes that task much more manageable.



#9 Oriole85

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 03:47 PM

Even for players who don't go on to the NFL, I think they and the programs end up doing a disservice by not giving themselves the opportunity to acquire the social/life skills other students do. But it's more about what will win games than preparing them for life. And like I said, the coaches I'm sure overwhelmingly encourage it. And that's understandable, since in addition to winning football coaches are also held responsible for the actions of 100 young men, regardless of time or location. Being able to keep them all under one roof makes that task much more manageable.

No disagreement, just worth noting that prespective pro athletes pressures in the NFL will be a lot bigger than in college most liekly.

 

Bottomline for the coaches win games. Then everything else follows (assuming there's no very serious crimes).... Second thing, have the athletes stay out of trouble. Third, have them graduate. And so on and so forth. If you aren't winning game, you aren't going to last long in this day and age. Does Ohio State care about the "conduct" of Urban Meyers players probably, but that's masked by his success.


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#10 Russ

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 03:48 PM

Practically speaking, any scholarship athlete at a D1 school is an athlete first and a student second. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
It's a bit of an oxymoron in the order of it especially when it comes to football and basketball and the expectations for them from the school. I had a writing class with the punter of Colorado when I was there and I actually ended up getting paired with him for some writing reviews, a bunch of us were doing the whole pay-for-play issue. I just remember when I worded it student-athlete, his feedback was all the coaches will tell you that football comes first.
Right, and I think it's expected by the athlete and by the athlete's parents that they're going to college to play basketball or football and not primarily to be a student. The kids that I think are getting the short end of the stick are the kids going to school on a swimming scholarship or lacrosse or some other sport where college is going to be their last stop on the competitive sports track. A lot of these kids have their schedules determined by their coaching staffs and certain majors are closed off to them directly or indirectly due to the time demands the sport takes up in their college life. These guys aren't getting the college experience and they're not getting the education they were promised either. It's almost a con. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2

#11 DJ MC

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 03:58 PM

I put up an article a while back, night be in the Manziel section? I'm sure other players do it as well, but they don't receive the attention for this that JM does. What Manziel said was he went to classes for the first few weeks or so in the 2nd semester and other students were asking for him for his autograph, taking picture, etc and it got to be too much for him. But partying on Bourbon Street among his other social activities wasn't.

 

I agree with a lot of what you have to say. There are definitely advantages but you can't live your whole life in a bubble. And for those who actually do become pros, they'll be worse off for it in the long-run if they self-isolate themselves. And yes, it's counterintutive to the mission of college, which is adapting academically as well as socially. The whole "learning doesn't stop in the classrom." In essence, I wish they would get away from this, but realistically it's only going to become more like this.

There's a big difference between being famous in public, and being famous in a different environment. If his presence is disruptive to the educational experience, be it his own or that of others (both trying to learn and trying to get his attention), even if it isn't his fault, he shouldn't be required to put himself in that position.


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#12 Oriole85

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 04:14 PM

Right, and I think it's expected by the athlete and by the athlete's parents that they're going to college to play basketball or football and not primarily to be a student. The kids that I think are getting the short end of the stick are the kids going to school on a swimming scholarship or lacrosse or some other sport where college is going to be their last stop on the competitive sports track. A lot of these kids have their schedules determined by their coaching staffs and certain majors are closed off to them directly or indirectly due to the time demands the sport takes up in their college life. These guys aren't getting the college experience and they're not getting the education they were promised either. It's almost a con. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2

Unless they are going to be a professional swimmer or lacrosse player (which neither is usually too lucrative), that is absurd. You go to college primarily to further your development and yes sports is a way to do that. As you said for most college athletes, it will be the last competitive sports they play (as that NCAA commercial goes). It's not like playing college sports is a right. Ideally, colleges should be flexible though.


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#13 BSLMikeLowe

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 06:21 PM

No disagreement, just worth noting that prespective pro athletes pressures in the NFL will be a lot bigger than in college most liekly.

 

Bottomline for the coaches win games. Then everything else follows (assuming there's no very serious crimes).... Second thing, have the athletes stay out of trouble. Third, have them graduate. And so on and so forth. If you aren't winning game, you aren't going to last long in this day and age. Does Ohio State care about the "conduct" of Urban Meyers players probably, but that's masked by his success.

 

Those items are often inter-related too. Which is to say that if law enforcement and the NCAA crack down because you aren't doing good enough on items #2 and #3, then priority #1 becomes much more difficult. And since NCAA rules mandate that coaches can only have so many hours per week of direct supervision over players, the logical solution now seems to be to put all the new revenues to use by building facilities that are so lavish and have enough amenities that the players will want to spend more of their free time there voluntarily. And if any incidents do happen to occur, these places are probably self-contained enough that it would be much easier to sweep it under the rug.



#14 BSLMikeLowe

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 12:07 PM

And here is Oregon's response.

 

http://www.goducks.c...8&DB_OEM_ID=500



#15 Oriole85

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 09:46 PM


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#16 Oriole85

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:16 PM

Chicago TribuneNorthwestern gets green light to build lakefront athletic facility

 

 Donations have poured in despite the Wildcats' 5-7 record last season. Sources said construction of the two-building complex will begin by early 2015 and should take about two years to complete.

 

The school will announce Friday, the Tribune has learned, that it is launching a new fundraising campaign and that Mark and Kimbra Walter have donated $40 million to be used for athletics and law school scholarships. Mark Walter, a graduate of NU's law school, is the controlling owner of the Los Angeles Dodgers.


NU officials have been tight-lipped since unveiling plans for the project in September 2012. The price tag for the facility on the shore of Lake Michigan is likely to exceed the original estimate of $220 million.

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#17 DJ MC

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:28 PM

Chicago TribuneNorthwestern gets green light to build lakefront athletic facility

 

Oriole Park cost $225 million 22 years ago. Now that's what a private school with a second-rate athletics program needs for a practice facility.

 

Sometimes I really hate sports.


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#18 Oriole85

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:38 PM

Oriole Park cost $225 million 22 years ago. Now that's what a private school with a second-rate athletics program needs for a practice facility.

 

Sometimes I really hate sports.

They're trying not to be second-rate.


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#19 DJ MC

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:41 PM

They're trying not to be second-rate.

 

I know they're trying. That's not the point :P


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#20 Oriole85

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 11:32 AM

CBS SportsReport: Minnesota to build $70 million practice facility

 

The Star-Tribune is reporting that the school will break ground on a new football facility in December, and it will include an indoor practice facility, coaching offices and "other amenities for the program." The project is set to cost the school $70 million.


Minnesota currently practices in the Gibson-Nagurski Football Complex, but the 55-foot ceilings aren't high enough to allow the team to simulate kicks and punts under game conditions. That building was recently renovated for $1 million.


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