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RIP Earl Weaver


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#21 Spoonless

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 11:57 AM

Glad he got to have his statue put up and experience an O's playoff run before he passed.

#22 Mark Carver

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:16 PM

As someone that grew up in East Baltimore during the good ole days of the great Oriole teams of the 60's-70's. Remember this was a time when there was no cable, no internet and on TV it consisted of 3 channels. So there was really only 1 thing to do as a kid in the summer, especially for a young boy. Our neighborhood had a good amount of young boys so in the summer it was pickup baseball and when not doing that it was listening to the Orioles on a small transistor radio. Those teams were led by arguably one of the greatest baseball managers ever (1,480–1,060, .583%)

He got the most out of a 25 man roster than any manager I've ever seen. Before there was Moneyball there was Earl Weaver and would platoon Gary Roenicke and John Lowenstein in LF. Bat Ken Singleton leadoff (578 PA) at times because he was the teams best OBP player and that had many others scratching their head. MLB had to create a rule to stop him because of a loophole in the DH rule. He would list a starting pitcher (that would be sitting on the bench and not playing) as the DH. Than he would switch to the DH when they would come of bat for the first time. He would do this in case the opposing team starter got pulled do to an injury or ineffectiveness before the DH would bat.

Yeah his historic being thrown out of 91 games was sometimes more theatrical than substance, But he did that to try and gain an advantage anyway he can. And since winning was everything to him, why not. I'm just glad he was aliveto see the Orioles regain their winning ways before he passed.
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John Keegan, a renowned British military historian, has called World War II the greatest single event in the history of mankind. - Tom Brokaw, NBC special correspondent and author of "The Greatest Generation"


#23 Mark Carver

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:18 PM

QUhm8rjEuVo

John Keegan, a renowned British military historian, has called World War II the greatest single event in the history of mankind. - Tom Brokaw, NBC special correspondent and author of "The Greatest Generation"


#24 Ricker Says

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:20 PM

As someone that grew up in East Baltimore during the good ole days of the great Oriole teams of the 60's-70's. Remember this was a time when there was no cable, no internet and on TV it consisted of 3 channels. So there was really only 1 thing to do as a kid in the summer, especially for a young boy. Our neighborhood had a good amount of young boys so in the summer it was pickup baseball and when not doing that it was listening to the Orioles on a small transistor radio. Those teams were led by arguably one of the greatest baseball managers ever (1,480–1,060, .583%)

He got the most out of a 25 man roster than any manager I've ever seen. Before there was Moneyball there was Earl Weaver and would platoon Gary Roenicke and John Lowenstein in LF. Bat Ken Singleton leadoff (578 PA) at times because he was the teams best OBP player and that had many others scratching their head. MLB had to create a rule to stop him because of a loophole in the DH rule. He would list a starting pitcher (that would be sitting on the bench and not playing) as the DH. Than he would switch to the DH when they would come of bat for the first time. He would do this in case the opposing team starter got pulled do to an injury or ineffectiveness before the DH would bat.

Yeah his historic being thrown out of 91 games was sometimes more theatrical than substance, But he did that to try and gain an advantage anyway he can. And since winning was everything to him, why not. I'm just glad he was to see the Orioles regain their winning ways before he passed.

Very well said.
@0TheRick0 (AKA The Rick)
"You can't sit on a lead and run a few plays into the line and just kill the clock. You've got to throw the ball over the damn plate and give the other man his chance. That's why baseball is the greatest game of them all." ~ The Earl of Baltimore

#25 Mark Carver

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:38 PM

From Ken Burns' Baseball

Ssx1hNSs4TI

John Keegan, a renowned British military historian, has called World War II the greatest single event in the history of mankind. - Tom Brokaw, NBC special correspondent and author of "The Greatest Generation"


#26 Mike B

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:40 PM

As someone that grew up in East Baltimore during the good ole days of the great Oriole teams of the 60's-70's. Remember this was a time when there was no cable, no internet and on TV it consisted of 3 channels. So there was really only 1 thing to do as a kid in the summer, especially for a young boy. Our neighborhood had a good amount of young boys so in the summer it was pickup baseball and when not doing that it was listening to the Orioles on a small transistor radio. Those teams were led by arguably one of the greatest baseball managers ever (1,480–1,060, .583%)

He got the most out of a 25 man roster than any manager I've ever seen. Before there was Moneyball there was Earl Weaver and would platoon Gary Roenicke and John Lowenstein in LF. Bat Ken Singleton leadoff (578 PA) at times because he was the teams best OBP player and that had many others scratching their head. MLB had to create a rule to stop him because of a loophole in the DH rule. He would list a starting pitcher (that would be sitting on the bench and not playing) as the DH. Than he would switch to the DH when they would come of bat for the first time. He would do this in case the opposing team starter got pulled do to an injury or ineffectiveness before the DH would bat.

Yeah his historic being thrown out of 91 games was sometimes more theatrical than substance, But he did that to try and gain an advantage anyway he can. And since winning was everything to him, why not. I'm just glad he was aliveto see the Orioles regain their winning ways before he passed.



Excellent post, well said!!
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#27 BSLRobShields

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:01 PM

It was great listening to Timmy K on the radio this morning talking about weaver...Said no one taught him more about baseball than Weaver did.

Weaver was truly the first(or one of the first at least) sabermetric guy.
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#28 mweb08

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:04 PM

Very sad news. Like some others have said, I'm a bit young to have much of a memory of him, but I've always appreciated what he had done for Orioles baseball. Considering this, I'm even more glad that the O's has his and the other statue ceremonies last year and that they had a great season.
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#29 Why Not?

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:05 PM

This says so much about Weaver, Baltimore and baseball.

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=D13-QS5eQMM

#30 BSLRobShields

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:22 PM

It was great listening to Timmy K on the radio this morning talking about weaver...Said no one taught him more about baseball than Weaver did.

Weaver was truly the first(or one of the first at least) sabermetric guy.

http://www.baltimore... ... 5495.story
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#31 DuffMan

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:31 PM

They don't make them like him anymore. RIP Earl you will be missed.

#32 SammyBirdland

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 03:11 PM

Posted Image
¡Hasta la vista, pelota!

#33 BSLMikeLowe

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 04:00 PM

What awful news, and on the day of FanFest no less. I am old enough to remember the Earl Years. He was preaching Moneyball principles before there ever was such a thing. One of a kind.

RIP

Posted Image

#34 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 04:01 PM

CBS Sports: Some of Earl's best quotes
http://www.cbssports...seball/21582984

CBS Sports: Remember Weaver as true innovator
http://www.cbssports...-true-innovator

#35 Oriole85

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 04:14 PM

ESPN: Earl Weaver: Irascible and brilliant

http://espn.go.com/m...ways-ahead-game

Really enjoyed this Kurkjian piece, particularly the anecdote about what the DL was to him.

ESPN: My favorite Earl Weaver story

http://espn.go.com/m...eball-character
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#36 SammyBirdland

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 04:31 PM

A couple thoughts about the passing of Earl Weaver...

I'm glad he got to be present for his statue ceremony.

I'm glad he got to see the 2012 Orioles season, because I know he cared a whole lot for the team.

And, I'm glad he got to go out on a cruise ship in the Caribbean instead of in a hospital bed.
¡Hasta la vista, pelota!

#37 bmoreb

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 04:47 PM

I'm old enough to remember Earl from the late seventies. Went to all the post season games in '79, was 8 years old. Still have ticket stubs, spent years hating the pirates.

Remember my grandfather who had seen Ken Keiser wrestle in person, talk about Earl being crazy to get in his face.

#38 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:10 PM

Beyond The Boxscore: Earl Weaver
http://www.beyondthe...weaver-19302013

#39 Can_of_corn

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:49 PM

Best piece I have found today.

Posnanski of course.

http://joeposnanski.... ... imore.html
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Well I hear Linda Ronstadt is looking for a guitar player.


#40 DBean

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:16 PM

I was in line when I heard the story. Just thought it was a rumor because I hadn't heard from any other sites yet. Orioles did have the jersey up and the #4 hanging.

Although I didn't really get to see him as a manager, when I think of life-long Orioles, Earl Weaver was always one of the first ones I think of. At least he was able to witness another Orioles winning season and get a nice ceremony before he died.
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