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#161 Mackus

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 06:33 AM

Ken, Don, Jordan, Gabe, Mike and any others with good scouting film backgrounds...could you write a primer post or blog on the D-Line so dolts like me can learn what the basic differences are between a 3-technique or 5- or whatever else, what skills make a player better suited for one position versus the other, and what positions are used on various types of base defense and subpackage?
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#162 TwentyThirtyFive

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 08:47 AM


Ken, Don, Jordan, Gabe, Mike and any others with good scouting film backgrounds...could you write a primer post or blog on the D-Line so dolts like me can learn what the basic differences are between a 3-technique or 5- or whatever else, what skills make a player better suited for one position versus the other, and what positions are used on various types of base defense and subpackage?

There is some good basic info in the video Ken linked. A more in depth blog, video, etc would be nice as well.

#163 BSLGabeFerguson

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 03:53 PM

Ken, Don, Jordan, Gabe, Mike and any others with good scouting film backgrounds...could you write a primer post or blog on the D-Line so dolts like me can learn what the basic differences are between a 3-technique or 5- or whatever else, what skills make a player better suited for one position versus the other, and what positions are used on various types of base defense and subpackage?

Technique is defined by the position where the defensive lineman aligns over the offensive lineman. You can "count" shoulders starting with the C to identify what technique a defender is playing

 

 

       T     G     C      G      T    TE                                        TE    T     G     C      G      T    

    5T           1T         3T         7T                                  SAM     5T          1T          3T      RUSH

 

If you start in the middle of the offensive line (the Center), lining up over the shoulder of the C is considered the one-technique. This is your traditional NT. There are some different alignments here - it can be lined up over the head of the center which is considered the zero-technique (0T) and also the "shade" where the NT aligns at an angle over the center.

 

The next traditional position is the three-technique (3T) - this is where the DT aligns over the outside shoulder of the OG. There are various defensive fronts that deploy this position differently, but this is often given to your most athletic/disruptive DT that is able to penetrate into the backfield and get after the QB. Think Warren Sapp or Aaron Donald. 

 

The five-technique (5T) is going to align on the outside shoulder of the OT. Sometimes this player will shift inside and play on the inside shoulder of the OT (4T). This is the traditional alignment of a DE in a 3-4 defense and is often valued for run defense over pass-rush. In modern defenses, this player is expected to be a more versatile defender than can move inside to play 3T as an interior pass-rusher. Calais Campbell is the prototype for this position.

 

Defensive lineman aligning over the TE, depending on the defensive front would be considered a seven-technique (7T). In a 3-4 defense, this would be the SAM LB (strong side is defined by presence of the in-line TE). On the other side you have your RUSH LB or it could be referred to as the LEO in some 4-3 fronts. 

 

When you have DEs aligned even further outside of the TE, it's called the Wide - 9 alignment. This allows the Edge rushers to supposedly have an advantage in rushing the passer while requiring LBs to fill in the gaps in run defense.


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#164 Hooded Viper

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 04:04 PM

Technique is defined by the position where the defensive lineman aligns over the offensive lineman. You can "count" shoulders starting with the C to identify what technique a defender is playing

 

 

       T     G     C      G      T    TE                                        TE    T     G     C      G      T    

    5T           1T         3T         7T                                  SAM     5T          1T          3T      RUSH

 

If you start in the middle of the offensive line (the Center), lining up over the shoulder of the C is considered the one-technique. This is your traditional NT. There are some different alignments here - it can be lined up over the head of the center which is considered the zero-technique (0T) and also the "shade" where the NT aligns at an angle over the center.

 

The next traditional position is the three-technique (3T) - this is where the DT aligns over the outside shoulder of the OG. There are various defensive fronts that deploy this position differently, but this is often given to your most athletic/disruptive DT that is able to penetrate into the backfield and get after the QB. Think Warren Sapp or Aaron Donald. 

 

The five-technique (5T) is going to align on the outside shoulder of the OT. Sometimes this player will shift inside and play on the inside shoulder of the OT (4T). This is the traditional alignment of a DE in a 3-4 defense and is often valued for run defense over pass-rush. In modern defenses, this player is expected to be a more versatile defender than can move inside to play 3T as an interior pass-rusher. Calais Campbell is the prototype for this position.

 

Defensive lineman aligning over the TE, depending on the defensive front would be considered a seven-technique (7T). In a 3-4 defense, this would be the SAM LB (strong side is defined by presence of the in-line TE). On the other side you have your RUSH LB or it could be referred to as the LEO in some 4-3 fronts. 

 

When you have DEs aligned even further outside of the TE, it's called the Wide - 9 alignment. This allows the Edge rushers to supposedly have an advantage in rushing the passer while requiring LBs to fill in the gaps in run defense.

Awesome information, thanks very much.


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#165 Don Olsen

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Posted 05 April 2020 - 11:50 AM

I scrolled the internet and I believe this will give you sound logic of defensive line alignments without me regurgitating information. Note it's three parts 4-3 Tampa Bay 2 style base NFL defenses that run 4-3), traditional 4-3, traditional 3-4.

 

https://football.cal...ensiveLine.html

 

 

Wink's base assignments are a slight variation on the traditional 3-4.  The NT will be typically in the 1 Gap weak side.  The DT will be more of a shade 3 gap, more of a 4 gap assignment strong side.  The SAM (strong side linebacker) will be stacked on the line ranging from heads up on the TE (7) and out of slightly reach on the line 9.  The WILL or RUSH linebacker on the weak side mostly will be in a two point stance playing slightly off the line (if you had a TE, you call it off ball 7).  This gives them the ability to get speed into the equation with hands.  It makes OLB bend a critical assessment in how they might perform at the next level against quality LT.

 

Typically the off ball linebacker looks to shoot the B gap (between RG/RT), and the ILB is typically looking to shoot the A gap (between LG/C).

 

They will run slight variations in personal, but typically the same look.  Sometime you may have a 3-3-5, with Clark (or Levine) rolling down in a delayed blitz, hoping to catch the RT sleeping with a chip responsibility on the DT and they lock to engage a double team.

 

With interior blitzes, you can see double A gap at times.  Whenever you see non-traditional gaps, you can anticipate the assignment is to crash down the line, allowing the linebacker to scrap.

 

When you have two defensive lineman doing the crash (either direction) the other lineman loops, which is what we call a stunt.  You can sometime hear this same terminology with OLB and DE/DT/NT, but that is really more of a blitz and a glorified stunt...but its also semantics and all are just trying to force a double team to allow the patience of the other defender slip by to go unabated to the QB.


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