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BSL: Jackson’s improved, but where does he still need to grow?


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#161 Mackus

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 10:28 AM

Comparing straight stats is hard across generations.  It's much easier to pass now than it is when Stafford was a rookie and that was much easier than when McNair was a rookie.

 

2019 league QBs (scaled to 14 games):  64.6 comp pct, 3224 passing yards, 6.9 Y/A, 21 TD, 11 INT  (91.4 rating)

2009 league QBs (Stafford rookie, 14 g):  60.9 comp pct, 3059 passing yards, 6.6 Y/A, 20 TD, 14 INT (83.0 rating)

1995 league QBs (McNair rookie, 14 g):  58.2 comp pct, 3091 passing yards, 6.3 Y/A, 20 TD, 15 INT  (79.2 rating)



#162 cprenegade

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 10:39 AM

You can't compare QB's from years ago.  The rules changes have made it impossible to compare QB stats of today to even those of just a few years ago.  For example, this year to date Derek Carr is completing 74% of his passes.  Matt Ryan and Dak Prescott are also at the 70% level.  Even Joe Flacco is completing 65.7% of his passes.  You can't judge any of todays QB passing stats by QBs from the past.  The relaxed rules that favor the passing game have raised the bar significantly from what it used to be. 


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#163 BSLJordanKough

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 01:00 PM

Comparing straight stats is hard across generations.  It's much easier to pass now than it is when Stafford was a rookie and that was much easier than when McNair was a rookie.

 

2019 league QBs (scaled to 14 games):  64.6 comp pct, 3224 passing yards, 6.9 Y/A, 21 TD, 11 INT  (91.4 rating)

2009 league QBs (Stafford rookie, 14 g):  60.9 comp pct, 3059 passing yards, 6.6 Y/A, 20 TD, 14 INT (83.0 rating)

1995 league QBs (McNair rookie, 14 g):  58.2 comp pct, 3091 passing yards, 6.3 Y/A, 20 TD, 15 INT  (79.2 rating)

 

Pretty sure that was Stafford's last 14 games, not his rookie season. Agreed, not night and day to McNair to Lamar. I don't think this means anything about Lamar's future but is interesting to look at. 



#164 BSLJordanKough

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 01:05 PM

One of Barnwell's other comparisons was actually to make the same point. That Dalton who is the 28th worst QB this year would be average in 1999. 

 

Player A: 57.1% completion percentage, 6.8 yards per attempt, 3.4% INT rate, 77.1 passer rating Player B: 60.1% completion percentage, 6.7 yards per attempt, 2.8% INT rate, 77.9 passer rating

This one's just here to contextualize how much the NFL has changed over the past 20 years, and how important it is to put stats in context. Player A is the collected passing performance of the NFL during the 1999 season; though that includes work by backups and the occasional trick play, this is essentially what average quarterback play looked like 20 years ago.

Player B is Andy Dalton's 2019 season so far. I understand if you haven't really been paying close attention to an 0-7 Bengals team, but Dalton ranks 28th in passer rating and Total QBR. An average quarterback from 1999 -- a passer like Steve McNair or Jeff Garcia, by the numbers -- would be barely playable by the numbers in 2019.



#165 hallas

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 02:27 PM

You can't compare QB's from years ago. The rules changes have made it impossible to compare QB stats of today to even those of just a few years ago. For example, this year to date Derek Carr is completing 74% of his passes. Matt Ryan and Dak Prescott are also at the 70% level. Even Joe Flacco is completing 65.7% of his passes. You can't judge any of todays QB passing stats by QBs from the past. The relaxed rules that favor the passing game have raised the bar significantly from what it used to be.


The rules changes favoring passing are getting out of hand imo. Running the ball should still be a viable option, and yet it feels like it isn’t unless your runner is under center or you’re Saquon Barkley.
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#166 JStruds

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 05:31 PM

The rules changes favoring passing are getting out of hand imo. Running the ball should still be a viable option, and yet it feels like it isn’t unless your runner is under center or you’re Saquon Barkley.


It is out of control. The officials need to be given back some measure of decision over severity of contact. Did the DE's hand graze the QB too high, or did he turn his neck? Did the tackle at the thighs endanger the QB's knees, or merely bring him down. And, let's not even approach clean hits like Fort's last Sunday.

#167 jamesdean

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 05:23 AM

You can't compare QB's from years ago.  The rules changes have made it impossible to compare QB stats of today to even those of just a few years ago.  For example, this year to date Derek Carr is completing 74% of his passes.  Matt Ryan and Dak Prescott are also at the 70% level.  Even Joe Flacco is completing 65.7% of his passes.  You can't judge any of todays QB passing stats by QBs from the past.  The relaxed rules that favor the passing game have raised the bar significantly from what it used to be. 

Not to mention that the receivers are protected too.  You can press and hold only so much and then you'll get a holding or pass interference call.  That also heavily contributes to a passer's completion percentage.  Back in the day when quarterbacks could be pounded into submission and receivers mugged going down the field, a 55-60% completion rate was considered upper echelon.  So, I agree with you 100%.  Comparing quarterbacks from different eras is complete futility. 



#168 Mackus

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 06:24 AM

You absolutely can compare quarterbacks across eras. Just need to acknowledge the differences in gameplay and try to account for those somehow.

#169 85Knight

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 09:29 AM

Nice breakdown by Baldinger.

https://twitter.com/...0601285632?s=19

#170 Ravens2006

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 09:36 PM

Lamar has shown a lot of improvement to me when it comes to throwing the ball, much more than I expected.  And I was a big skeptic even after his raw W/L record last year.  That said, he can still go farther with that too obviously.  I like the speed at which he's making some decisions too post-snap, after reading coverage pre-snap.  My biggest hope is that he just continues to focus on those things, and doesn't revert too quickly to the one look and take off mode too often.  But he's shown enough so far to give me a lot more confidence than I had two months ago.  I was firmly in the "He's a RB who can throw a little camp" and he's proven to be more than that so far.

 

As for comparing different eras... just imagine what a guy like Unitas (and many other top QBs of the past) could have done if THEY got a fresh set of downs every time a DE slapped their helmet, or brushed their outer thigh...  :)


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