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#61 BSLRobShields

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Posted 13 November 2019 - 04:11 PM

How will they know how long you are without service?

Who is to say people will tell the truth?
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#62 Mackus

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Posted 13 November 2019 - 04:15 PM

You really can't. How many videogame launches have we seen with lag, long load times, horrible matchmaking? That's all server load. After 2 decades of launching games with online pull they STILL can't estimate when new games launch. Bungie just had the same problem their first launch after dropping Activision (Destiny - Shadowkeep) The first day was unplayable, by the second they figured out how to adjust the load. They originally spread servers out uniformly across the US and different countries, and then after they've seen where the most pull is, and areas that don't need as much, they reallocate servers they have and add new ones if they run out. The very first online games had servers where you chose where you wanted to play...gameplay would reflect that so if you lived here and played on a Tokyo server, your lag would be gnarly, but you could find servers with the lowest load manually. It's all automated now, so they have to adjust on the fly.

 

The problem isn't just estimating the total usage, but where the bottlenecks in your network are and how deep your queues are for every hop.  Everything needs to be sized accordingly.  It's not one long pipe from console to server.  There are tons of hubs, ports, and other hops and all of them have to flow traffic in a coordinated way.  It's not just knowing that you have 5 guests coming for dinner so you put 5 chairs at your table.  You also have to make sure that if your door is only wide enough to let 1 of them in the house at a time that your porch is deep enough to hold the others while they wait for their turn.  And 10 other silly analogy points.

 

Networks are really hard.  And they are an art as well as a technical endeavor.  


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#63 Ricker Says

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Posted 13 November 2019 - 04:16 PM

How will they know how long you are without service?

Who is to say people will tell the truth?

They know. They already do know. That's basic technology these days, to be very well aware of when their system isn't operating as it should.
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"You can't sit on a lead and run a few plays into the line and just kill the clock. You've got to throw the ball over the damn plate and give the other man his chance. That's why baseball is the greatest game of them all." ~ The Earl of Baltimore

#64 BSLRobShields

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Posted 13 November 2019 - 04:18 PM

They know. They already do know. That's basic technology these days, to be very well aware of when their system isn't operating as it should.


How are they going to know that John Smith was without service for x amount of time?

We never had an issue at our house. What would stop me from calling and saying I need free service?

I mean, I wouldn’t do that because that’s shitty but plenty of people would take advantage of it.
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#65 Mackus

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Posted 13 November 2019 - 04:21 PM

How are they going to know that John Smith was without service for x amount of time?

We never had an issue at our house. What would stop me from calling and saying I need free service?

I mean, I wouldn’t do that because that’s shitty but plenty of people would take advantage of it.

 

It's easy to tell when the connection is lost completely and you have no signal.  There are log records of that down to the subsecond I would guess.  

 

What would be difficult is if the signal is simply degraded, like in the Comcast example I gave.  The connection is still good, just the picture is pixelated rather than gone and no error messages are being thrown.  They don't easily know when it started or when it's fixed.  I tell them when I first notice it happening and then on the back end when I notice that the problem has gone away.  If it fixed itself before I notice it's resolved, I have no way to determine that.






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