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Tanner Scott


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#1 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 03:25 PM

MASN: http://www.masnsport...re-promise.html

 

O's 21-year-old left-handed pitching prospect Tanner Scott once again touched 101 mph with his fastball. Scott had also touched triple digits in O's instructional league and in earlier AFL games. He threw 1 1/3 scoreless innings for Peoria on 13 pitches, 11 for strikes.

O's officials have to be quite encouraged that Scott has gotten seven outs in his last two AFL outings while needing just 20 pitches to go 2 1/3 innings with 18 strikes. In 42 1/3 innings in 2015 between short-season Single-A Aberdeen and Single-A Delmarva, Scott pitched to an ERA of 3.83. He walked 22 and fanned 60 batters.

The O's drafted Scott in the sixth round out of Howard (Texas) Junior College in 2014. He was signed to a well overslot $650,000 bonus. He has pitched often between 94 and 97 mph, but clearly can throw harder. Scott is a secret no more - if he ever was.



#2 BSLRobShields

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 03:55 PM

Got to love the arm.

 

Potential late inning BP arm that could move quickly.


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#3 RShack

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 04:51 PM

Why can't he start?


 "You say you've lost your faith, but that's not where its at.

  You have no faith to lose, and ya know it" - Bob Dylan


#4 Matt_P

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Posted 04 November 2015 - 10:38 AM

Why can't he start?

 

I don't know if he can't but he only has two pitches at the moment and was used as a reliever in the minors this year. They could try teaching him a changeup but the Os really need another lefty in the bullpen and if he can throw 100 then that would be huge.

 

It appears that the Os want to work on refining the pitches that he already throws rather than teaching him something new.


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#5 Baby Birdland

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Posted 14 November 2015 - 06:23 PM

Why can't he start?


His slider is slighty below average and changeup is well below average. Just not a good enough arsenal to be a starter. Could be a good MLB reliever though.
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#6 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 26 December 2015 - 06:39 PM

2080 Baseball: Tanner Scott Profile

http://2080baseball....s/tanner-scott/


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#7 RShack

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Posted 26 December 2015 - 09:44 PM

2080 Baseball: Tanner Scott Profile

http://2080baseball....s/tanner-scott/

 

Things I Don't Know Dept:  Item 629

 

That lists goodness scores for both present and future versions of his pitches.

 

I understand how and why somebody can give a future rating on a FB... why you might see potential improvement for some guys but not others...

 

But how can they do that for change-ups and sliders?   How can you know that a guy is almost-certain to not get better at those pitches?


 "You say you've lost your faith, but that's not where its at.

  You have no faith to lose, and ya know it" - Bob Dylan


#8 JeremyStrain

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Posted 27 December 2015 - 08:54 AM

Things I Don't Know Dept:  Item 629

 

That lists goodness scores for both present and future versions of his pitches.

 

I understand how and why somebody can give a future rating on a FB... why you might see potential improvement for some guys but not others...

 

But how can they do that for change-ups and sliders?   How can you know that a guy is almost-certain to not get better at those pitches?

 

Obviously you can't know for sure, but it's an educated assumption based on what you are seeing. Assuming no major change happens (like learning a new grip, working with a specific coach that specializes, overhauling mechanics, etc) that's how they see it getting based on every day use and development. When they see these guys, they are works in progress, TRYING to make them better pitches, so when they say future grades, based on flashes of what they've seen they can kinda see what it should be like. Say once in every 10 pitches they rip a REALLY good one, so you see the ability to throw it, it's just a matter of practice and development to do it more consistently.


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#9 RShack

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Posted 27 December 2015 - 12:10 PM

Obviously you can't know for sure, but it's an educated assumption based on what you are seeing. Assuming no major change happens (like learning a new grip, working with a specific coach that specializes, overhauling mechanics, etc) that's how they see it getting based on every day use and development. When they see these guys, they are works in progress, TRYING to make them better pitches, so when they say future grades, based on flashes of what they've seen they can kinda see what it should be like. Say once in every 10 pitches they rip a REALLY good one, so you see the ability to throw it, it's just a matter of practice and development to do it more consistently.

 

OK... but is it really that hard to develop a good change?   Don't lots of pitchers try new grips all the time, searching for one that works for them?


 "You say you've lost your faith, but that's not where its at.

  You have no faith to lose, and ya know it" - Bob Dylan


#10 JeremyStrain

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Posted 28 December 2015 - 09:47 AM

OK... but is it really that hard to develop a good change?   Don't lots of pitchers try new grips all the time, searching for one that works for them?

 

It's harder than you'd think. By the time they get to the majors, they are pretty sure they have the BEST grips and stuff for them, lots of guys are scared of change at that point because this is what got them there, but also they don't just want to constantly learn pitches and new things, they are focused on the stuff they have already. Even if they have 3 ML quality pitches, it's pretty hard to just "learn" another ML quality pitch, so some might tinker and try to get like a change to work, but never be able to get it there enough to use at the ML level.


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#11 Matt_P

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Posted 28 December 2015 - 09:56 AM

It's harder than you'd think. By the time they get to the majors, they are pretty sure they have the BEST grips and stuff for them, lots of guys are scared of change at that point because this is what got them there, but also they don't just want to constantly learn pitches and new things, they are focused on the stuff they have already. Even if they have 3 ML quality pitches, it's pretty hard to just "learn" another ML quality pitch, so some might tinker and try to get like a change to work, but never be able to get it there enough to use at the ML level.

 

But Tanner Scott isn't close to the majors. And everyone is saying that he isn't a starter unless he gets that third pitch. Isn't that enough to provide some incentive?

 

Now, I can certainly understand him focusing on what he has already because I can understand how a small change to one thing can impact everything. And he probably needs to practice alot and work hard to keep growing what he has. But isn't it obvious that he should at least try if he wants to start (and maybe focusing on being a good reliever makes the most sense for him)?



#12 JeremyStrain

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Posted 28 December 2015 - 10:14 AM

But Tanner Scott isn't close to the majors. And everyone is saying that he isn't a starter unless he gets that third pitch. Isn't that enough to provide some incentive?

 

Now, I can certainly understand him focusing on what he has already because I can understand how a small change to one thing can impact everything. And he probably needs to practice alot and work hard to keep growing what he has. But isn't it obvious that he should at least try if he wants to start (and maybe focusing on being a good reliever makes the most sense for him)?

 

Yeah, he SHOULD be working with all kinds of new things at that level. Honestly, I forgot who we were talking about and was just responding to the idea that learning a change should be easy and everyone should do it.

 

If I were the org, I would hire Jamie Moyer just to come in and work with guys on changing speeds and teaching his circle change, since they are so set on FB/CV/CH pitch sets.

 

I mean it's impossible to say without seeing him work in practice and or asking him about it, if a certain pitch works for him, and if it's possible to get it where it needs to be, but yeah, he'd be a prime candidate for me to learn a good change. Could easily have a 20mph difference between FB and CH, and that would be really hard to work against, especially if you have to focus on that velo difference, and then you add a power slider or something, so you see it coming faster, think it's the FB and then it's got a late break. It's not impossible for advanced hitters to focus on two pitches and the difference between them, so that you can adjust as soon as you see it, but when there's a third viable pitch that looks like one of the first and gets mixed in well, that's when you see pitchers really excell.


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#13 RShack

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Posted 28 December 2015 - 03:00 PM

Yeah, he SHOULD be working with all kinds of new things at that level. Honestly, I forgot who we were talking about and was just responding to the idea that learning a change should be easy and everyone should do it.

 

Well, actually, what you were responding to was something else... but it was a couple posts back, so I can see how the main point got lost...

 

The question was how can they say a P has already reached his ceiling about change-ups and sliders when he's still learning how to pitch right?  I can understand how they can think that about FB's... but change-ups and sliders?

 

ps:  I never meant to suggest that developing a pitch was easy.  But "easy" and "very possible" are not the same thing... as is demonstrated by the fact that it takes most MLB P's some number of *years* to learn enough to be MLB-ready....


 "You say you've lost your faith, but that's not where its at.

  You have no faith to lose, and ya know it" - Bob Dylan


#14 JeremyStrain

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Posted 28 December 2015 - 08:50 PM

Well, actually, what you were responding to was something else... but it was a couple posts back, so I can see how the main point got lost...

 

The question was how can they say a P has already reached his ceiling about change-ups and sliders when he's still learning how to pitch right?  I can understand how they can think that about FB's... but change-ups and sliders?

 

ps:  I never meant to suggest that developing a pitch was easy.  But "easy" and "very possible" are not the same thing... as is demonstrated by the fact that it takes most MLB P's some number of *years* to learn enough to be MLB-ready....

 

Very fair, I didn't read back at all, just read that one part and wanted to chime in.

 

It's more like they are evaluating future performance based on what is presented right now...if that makes any sense. No one could possibly know a guy could have a lights out slider if he doesn't throw one to be evaluated, but based on what can be seen at that time is what you are getting in these reports. Of course something could change down the road like you said, new grips, new mechanics etc. but basically you should insert the line into every evaluation you read, "without any other changes" this is how this will develop. It's not fair to the evaluators to ding them for not knowing a guy could have a much better pitch if he did a. or b. They are just presenting what they can see, and how things SHOULD improve based on what's being presented.

 

It's why a lot of guys seem to come out of left field, or move up prospect lists later in development, because like you said, one might change something working with a new coach one day and it makes a MAJOR improvement. Doesn't happen real often though, those guys that do a good job of this, like the 2080 guys, and others out there do a good job of evaluating what they can see, and projecting out.

 

Yeah I know what you mean, I completely paraphrased.


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#15 BSLRobShields

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Posted 17 February 2016 - 06:04 PM

http://www.baltimore...0216-story.html

Reggie..thoughts on Scott?
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#16 ReggieYinger

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Posted 17 February 2016 - 08:56 PM

http://www.baltimore...0216-story.html

Reggie..thoughts on Scott?

I'll have a write up about him this weekend with my regular post, but IMO, he's best reliever in the org right now - minus Mychal Givens.


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#17 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 10:23 AM

Per Reggie Yinger / Feb 20th:
http://baltimorespor...prospect-press/

 

In just two years since being drafted by Baltimore in the 2014 MLB Draft, lefty Tanner Scott has made tremendous strides in the control/command department. He’s worked on his mechanics, to create a nice and fluid delivery. He has an electric arm, with a fastball (94-96 mph – 99 mph) – although I’ve heard he has hit 100+ a few times (I’ve only seen him top 99 mph in person). Additionally, he has a slider (81-85 mph) and a change-up (89-91 mph). His slider is the best of the two secondary offerings, with late sweeping action. The change-up is still a work in progress and is an easy pitch to pick up, due to the slower arm action and not offering much speed differential from his fastball. He’s not afraid to attack hitters with his fastball and does a good job of working both sides of the plate.

Going Forward:
I’ve mentioned this to a few people who have asked, but with the exception of Mychal Givens, Scott is the best reliever prospect in the organization. Even if his change-up doesn’t fully develop, he’s still a hard throwing lefty with an average slider. He’s worked tremendously hard on his command, as he’s lowered his BB% from 18% in 2014 to 12% in 2015, respectively. He should open the 2016 season in Frederick (A+).



#18 ReggieYinger

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 09:17 PM

More on Scott tonight. Big arm is there. Was sitting 97-98, but all over the place (don't look at the box score).


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#19 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 09:22 AM

PressBox: Five Things To Know About Orioles Prospect Tanner Scott

https://www.pressbox...ct-tanner-scott



#20 Mike B

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 07:48 PM

For some reason, reading this article brought memories of another lefty prospect.  Brad Pennington.

 

I get that hard throwing lefties are hard to find, but all the walks?  I have heard Dan and Buck say teams are always asking about him.  I would deal him.


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